Study Suggests Depression can be an Early Indicator of Alzheimer’s

Feb 03, 2015 Comments Off by

Taking care of seniors who have dementia is what we do at Luther Park.  Many people think this disease begins and ends with memory loss, but there are many other symptoms that can take a toll on caregivers and loved ones.  In this great article from HealthDay News, puts those other changes front and center, which can even show up before memory loss.

Below is an excerpt from the article from Wednesday, January 14th.  To read the whole article, click here.

Depression, sleep problems and behavioral changes can show up before signs of memory loss in people who go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease, a new study suggests.

“I wouldn’t worry at this point if you’re feeling anxious, depressed or tired that you have underlying Alzheimer’s, because in most cases it has nothing to do with an underlying Alzheimer’s process,” said study author Catherine Roe, an assistant professor of neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

“We’re just trying to get a better idea of what Alzheimer’s looks like before people are even diagnosed with dementia,” Roe added. “We’re becoming more interested in symptoms occurring with Alzheimer’s, but not what people typically think of.”

Tracking more than 2,400 middle-aged people for up to seven years, the researchers found that those who developed dementia were more than twice as likely to be diagnosed with depression sooner than those without dementia.

Other behavior and mood symptoms such as apathy, anxiety, appetite changes and irritability also arrived sooner in participants who went on to cope with typical dementia symptoms, according to the research, published online Jan. 14 in the journal Neurology.

More than 5 million Americans are currently affected by Alzheimer’s disease, a progressive, fatal illness causing not just memory loss but changes in personality, reasoning and judgment. About 500,000 people die each year from the incurable condition, which accounts for most cases of dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Above is an excerpt from the article from Wednesday, January 14th.  To read the whole article, click here.

Senior Health

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For over 30 years Luther Care Services has provided quality services for mature Iowans, meeting their physical, spiritual, social, and psychological needs on its beautiful rose-scaped grounds. As a non-profit, we are able to put our resources into providing better service, care, and housing for our residents. Aside from offering a wide range of living space and care options, our community is well known for its prized rose gardens. Over 50 varieties are represented among its 3,500 bushes. There’s even a grow-and-cut section providing fragrant, fresh blossoms for residents throughout the growing season!
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